THE Random Times
missdanidaniels:

Can we all take a minute to appreciate this Dr.Who watch a fan sent me 😍 thank you Gideon! 💙

missdanidaniels:

Can we all take a minute to appreciate this Dr.Who watch a fan sent me 😍 thank you Gideon! 💙

tornadotitans:

Supercell structure and lightning strike near Canadian, TX on June 22, 2014. One of the better looking storms we saw this past spring! The white cone looking appendage at the front of the storm actually was a cone funnel which briefly touched down a couple of minutes later.

tornadotitans:

Supercell structure and lightning strike near Canadian, TX on June 22, 2014. One of the better looking storms we saw this past spring! The white cone looking appendage at the front of the storm actually was a cone funnel which briefly touched down a couple of minutes later.

tornadotitans:

Supercell structure and lightning strike near Canadian, TX on June 22, 2014. One of the better looking storms we saw this past spring! The white cone looking appendage at the front of the storm actually was a cone funnel which briefly touched down a couple of minutes later.

tornadotitans:

Supercell structure and lightning strike near Canadian, TX on June 22, 2014. One of the better looking storms we saw this past spring! The white cone looking appendage at the front of the storm actually was a cone funnel which briefly touched down a couple of minutes later.

spaceplasma:

Extreme Ultraviolet Images of the Sun

Explanation of the colors used for SOHO extreme ultraviolet images of the Sun (that is, at wavelengths much shorter than “normal” ultraviolet wavelengths). Such radiation is also sometimes referred to as “soft” X-rays, since the boundary between X-rays and UV is rather arbitrarily set at about 100 Ångstroms.
All the images shown above were taken at wavelengths ten times shorter than the shortest visible wavelengths, imaging photons with ten times more energy than the most energetic visible photons. Since in the visible spectrum, shorter wavelengths correspond to blue and green light, and longer wavelengths to yellow, orange and red light, the shorter wavelength images are arbitrarily colored blue or green, and the longer wavelength images are colored amber or red.
The atoms (or, more accurately, since the atoms are missing one or more electrons, the ions) responsible for the wavelengths involved are indicated by Roman numerals which are one unit greater than the number of missing electrons. Hence, He II means helium ions which are missing one electron, and Fe XV means iron atoms which are missing fourteen electrons. The He II image looks different from the others, because it shows radiation from moderately hot helium atoms in the chromosphere; while the highly ionized iron atoms responsible for the other emissions are located in the lower corona.

Credit: SOHO - EIT Consortium, ESA, NASA, Courtney Seligman

spaceplasma:

Extreme Ultraviolet Images of the Sun

Explanation of the colors used for SOHO extreme ultraviolet images of the Sun (that is, at wavelengths much shorter than “normal” ultraviolet wavelengths). Such radiation is also sometimes referred to as “soft” X-rays, since the boundary between X-rays and UV is rather arbitrarily set at about 100 Ångstroms.

All the images shown above were taken at wavelengths ten times shorter than the shortest visible wavelengths, imaging photons with ten times more energy than the most energetic visible photons. Since in the visible spectrum, shorter wavelengths correspond to blue and green light, and longer wavelengths to yellow, orange and red light, the shorter wavelength images are arbitrarily colored blue or green, and the longer wavelength images are colored amber or red.

The atoms (or, more accurately, since the atoms are missing one or more electrons, the ions) responsible for the wavelengths involved are indicated by Roman numerals which are one unit greater than the number of missing electrons. Hence, He II means helium ions which are missing one electron, and Fe XV means iron atoms which are missing fourteen electrons. The He II image looks different from the others, because it shows radiation from moderately hot helium atoms in the chromosphere; while the highly ionized iron atoms responsible for the other emissions are located in the lower corona.

Credit: SOHO - EIT Consortium, ESA, NASA, Courtney Seligman

iluv2mstrb84u:

turnedoutebony:

Being a good girl, as always 😏

Luscious titties baby……..

allthesebitchez:

NoelleEaston

allthesebitchez:

NoelleEaston

give me harry potter.

cheskasmagicshire:

ibarfrainbow3s:

scalematecapekind:

thefuuuucomics:

i am so pissed

THIS MADE ME CRINGE

reblogging cause EGGplant

This fucked me up

supernaturalapocalypse:

LoOK hOw hAAAPpy eVerYONE iS